Scammers target parents by taking advantage of baby formula shortage – WGAL Susquehanna Valley Pa.

Scammers are taking advantage of the baby formula shortage.”We always say that scammers know what’s going on. They watch the news, and they will do anything they can to try to capitalize on whatever it is going on,” said Lisa Schiller, with the Better Business Bureau.The Better Business Bureau said fraudsters may set up fake websites or profiles on social media platforms to trick desperate parents and caregivers into paying steep prices for formula that never arrives.They’ll send the parent a direct message saying they have baby formula and will often send pictures of the cans. The caregiver will then send money through platforms like Venmo or PayPal and never get what they paid for.Before you order from an unfamiliar online store, check out the company or product by typing its name in a search engine followed by the words “review,” “complaint,” or “scam.” See what other people say about it.Consider how you pay. Credit cards give you the strongest protections, so you can sometimes get your money back if you ordered something but didn’t get it. Anyone who demands payment by gift card, money transfer or cryptocurrency is a scammer.Here is a tip worth repeating: Call your pediatrician to see if they have formula in stock. Pediatricians often get samples of different formulas and may be able to help.

Scammers are taking advantage of the baby formula shortage.

“We always say that scammers know what’s going on. They watch the news, and they will do anything they can to try to capitalize on whatever it is going on,” said Lisa Schiller, with the Better Business Bureau.

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The Better Business Bureau said fraudsters may set up fake websites or profiles on social media platforms to trick desperate parents and caregivers into paying steep prices for formula that never arrives.

They’ll send the parent a direct message saying they have baby formula and will often send pictures of the cans. The caregiver will then send money through platforms like Venmo or PayPal and never get what they paid for.

Before you order from an unfamiliar online store, check out the company or product by typing its name in a search engine followed by the words “review,” “complaint,” or “scam.” See what other people say about it.

Consider how you pay. Credit cards give you the strongest protections, so you can sometimes get your money back if you ordered something but didn’t get it. Anyone who demands payment by gift card, money transfer or cryptocurrency is a scammer.

Here is a tip worth repeating: Call your pediatrician to see if they have formula in stock. Pediatricians often get samples of different formulas and may be able to help.

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